Publications by Topic


William F. Brewer


w-brewer@uiuc.edu

This page is under construction.


I. KNOWLEDGE REPRESENTATION

	A. Knowledge  Representation: General

		1. Theory

a. Brewer, W. F. (1987).  Schemas versus mental models in human memory. In P. 
Morris (Ed.), Modelling cognition (pp. 187-197). Chichester: Wiley.

b. Brewer, W. F.  (1995).  To assert that essentially all human knowledge and 
memory is represented in terms of stories is certainly wrong.  In R. S. Wyer, 
Jr. (Ed.), Knowledge and memory: The real story.  Advances in Social 
Cognition.  Vol. 8 (pp. 109-119).  Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

		2. Experiments

a. Brewer, W. F., Perkins, S. & Choi, S. (in preparation).  Mental models 
versus schemas in human memory.

	B. Schemas

		1. Theory

a. Brewer, W. F., & Nakamura, G. V. (1984). The nature and functions of 
schemas. In R. S. Wyer & T. K. Srull (Eds.), Handbook of social cognition  
(Vol. 1, pp. 119-160).  Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

		2. Experiments

a. Brewer, W. F., & Treyens, J. C. (1981).  Role of schemata in memory for 
places. Cognitive Psychology, 13, 207-230.

b. Brewer, W. F., & Tenpenny, P. (in preparation).  The role of schemas in the 
recall and recognition of episodic information.

c. Brewer, W. F., & Dupree, D. A. (in preparation).  Schema acquisition: 
Episodic and generic memory for places.

d. Brewer, W. F. (in preparation).  Schema memory: Qualitative changes in 
memory for pictures.

	C. Mental Models

		1. Theory

a. Brewer, W. F.,  (in preparation).  What are mental models?

		2. Experiments

a. Lichtenstein, E. H., & Brewer, W. F. (1980).  Memory for goal-directed 
events. Cognitive Psychology, 12, 412-445.

b. Brewer, W. F., & Dupree, D. A. (1983).  Use of plan schemata in the recall 
and recognition of goal-directed actions.  Journal of Experimental Psychology: 
Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 9, 117-129.

	D. Naive Theories

a. Brewer, W. F., &  Mishra, P. (submitted).  The role of theories in the 
recall of text information.

Brewer, W. F. (thinking about).  Naive models of the natural world.


	E. Concepts

a. Brewer, W. F. (1993).  What are concepts? Issues of representation and 
ontology.  In G. V. Nakamura, R. M. Taraban, & D. L. Medin (Eds.), The 
psychology of learning and motivation (Vol. 29): Categorization by humans and 
machines (pp. 495-533).  San Diego, CA: Academic Press.


II. STRUCTURE OF DISCOURSE

	A. Stories

		1. Theory

a. Brewer, W. F. (1980).  Literary theory, rhetoric, stylistics: Implications 
for psychology.  In R. J. Spiro, B. C. Bruce, & W. F. Brewer (Eds.), 
Theoretical issues in reading comprehension (pp. 221-239). Hillsdale, NJ:  
Erlbaum.

b. Brewer, W. F. (1982).  Plan understanding, narrative comprehension, and 
story schemas.  Proceedings of the National Conference on Artificial 
Intelligence, 262-264.

c. Brewer, W. F., & Lichtenstein, E. H. (1982).  Stories are to entertain:  A 
structural-affect theory of stories.  Journal of Pragmatics, 6, 473-486.

d. Brewer, W. F.  (1995).  Discourse force and empirical studies of 
literature. In G. Rusch (Ed.), Empirical approaches to literature. (LUMIS 
Publications, Special Edition, Vol. VI, pp. 89-95).  LUMIS Publications, 
Siegen, Germany.

e. Brewer, W. F. (1995).  The problem of rereading for theories of story 
enjoyment.  In G. Rusch (Ed.), Empirical approaches to literature. (LUMIS 
Publications, Special Edition, Vol. VI, pp. 298-303).  LUMIS Publications, 
Siegen, Germany.

f. Brewer, W. F. (1996).  The nature of narrative suspense and the problem of 
rereading. In P. Vorderer, H. J. Wulff, & M. Friedrichsen (Eds.), Suspense: 
Conceptualizations, theoretical analyses, and empirical explorations (pp. 107-
127).  Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

		2. Experiments

a. Brewer, W.F., & Lichtenstein, E. H. (1981).  Event schemas, story schemas, 
and story grammars.  In J. Long & A. Baddeley (Eds.), Attention and 
performance IX (pp. 363-379). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

b. Brewer, W. F.  (1996).  Good and bad story endings and story completeness.  
In R. J. Kreuz & M. S. MacNealy (Eds.), Empirical approaches to literature and 
aesthetics (pp. 261-271).  Norwood, NJ: Ablex. 

c. Brewer, W. F. (in press).  Short story structure and affect: Evidence from 
cognitive psychology.  In Proceedings of the Second International Conference 
on the Short Story. 

d. Brewer, W. F., & Lichtenstein, E. H. (in preparation).  An affective and 
structural theory of the reader's story schema.

e. Brewer, W. F., & Lichtenstein, E. H. (in preparation).  The descriptive 
adequancy of four classes of story theories.

	B. Stories: Acquisition

		1. Experiments

a. Jose, P. E., & Brewer, W. F. (1984).  The development of story liking: 
Character identification, suspense, and outcome resolution.  Developmental 
Psychology, 20, 911-924.

b. Jose, P. E., & Brewer, W. F. (1990).  Early grade school children's liking 
of script and suspense story structures.  Journal of Reading Behavior, 22, 
355-372.

c. Brewer, W. F., & Hay, A. E. (in preparation).  The acquisition of the story 
schema in young children.

d. Dorfman, M., & Brewer, W. F. (in preparation).  Understanding the points of 
stories: A developmental study.

	C. Stories: Cross-Cultural

		1. Theory

a. Brewer, W. F. (1985).  The story schema:  Universal and culture-specific 
properties.  In D. R. Olson, N. Torrance, & A. Hildyard (Eds.), Literacy, 
language, and learning:  The nature and consequences of reading and writing 
(pp. 167-194).  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

		2. Experiments

a. Brewer, W. F., & Ohtsuka, K. (1988).  Story structure and reader affect in 
American and Hungarian short stories. In C. Martindale (Ed.), Psychological 
approaches to the study of literary narratives (pp. 133-158). Hamburg: Buske.
 
b. Brewer, W. F., & Ohtsuka, K. (1988). Story structure, characterization, 
just world organization, and reader affect in American and Hungarian short 
stories. Poetics, 17, 395-415.

c. Brewer, W. F. (1988).  Imagery and text genre. Text, 8, 431-438.

	D. Discourse: Memory

		1. Theory

a. Brewer, W. F.  (in press).  To assert that essentially all human knowledge 
and memory is represented in terms of stories is certainly wrong.  In R. S. 
Wyer, Jr. (Ed.), Knowledge and memory: The real story.  Advances in Social 
Cognition.  Vol. 8.  Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

		2. Experiments

a. Brewer, W. F., & Hay, A. E. (1984).  Reconstructive recall of linguistic 
style. Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 23, 237-249.

	E. Discourse: Comprehension

		1. Theory

a. Bock, J. K., & Brewer, W. F. (1985).  Discourse structure and mental models 
In T. H. Carr (Ed.), The development of reading skills.  New directions in 
child development No. 27 (pp. 55-75). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

		2. Experiments

a. Ohtsuka, K., & Brewer, W. F. (1992).  Discourse organization in the 
comprehen

b. Dorfman, M. H., & Brewer, W. F. (1994). Understanding the points of fables, 
Discourse Processes, 17, 105-129

c. Brewer, W. F., Harris, R. J., & Brewer, E. F. (in preparation).  
Comprehension of literal and figurative meaning.

d. Brewer, W. F. (in preparation).  The linguistic descriptions of spatial 
locations. 

e. Brewer, W. F. (in preparation).  Discourse organization in the 
comprehension of descriptive texts.


III. MEMORY


	A. General

		1. Theory

a. Brewer, W. F., & Pani, J. R. (1983).  The structure of human memory.  In G. 
H. Bower (Ed.), The psychology of learning and motivation:  Advances in 
research and theory (Vol. 17, pp. 1-38).  New York: Academic Press.

b.  Brewer, W. F. (1992).  Phenomenal experience in laboratory and 
autobiographical memory tasks.  In M. A. Conway, D. C. Rubin, H. Spinnler, & 
W. Wagenaar  (Eds.), Theoretical perspectives on autobiographical memory (pp. 
31-51).  Kluwer Academic Publishers.

c. Brewer, W. F.  (thinking about)  What is reconstructive recall?


		2. Experiments

a. Brewer, W. F. (1982).  Personal memory, generic memory, and skill:  A re-
analysis of the episodic-semantic distinction.  Proceedings of the Fourth 
Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, 112-113.

b. Birch, S., & Brewer, W. F. (1995).  The fate of originally presented 
surface information following recall errors in sentence memory tasks.  
European Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 7, 145-167.

c. Brewer, W. F., & Pani, J. R. (1996).  Reports of mental imagery in 
retrieval from long-term memory.  Consciousness and Cognition, 5, 265-287.

d. Brewer, W. F., & Schommer, M. (in preparation).  Imagery reports in 
scientists and nonscientists in a autobiographical memory task: Galton's 
Breakfast Questionnaire revisited.

e. Brewer, W. F., & Lockhart, D. W.  (in preparation).  The role of phenomenal 
experience in laboratory recognition memory tasks.

f. Brewer, W. F. (in progress).  Phenomenal experience during the 
reconstructive recall of coins.

	B. Autobiographical Memory

		1. Theory

a. Brewer, W. F. (1986).  What is autobiographical memory?  In D. Rubin (Ed.), 
Autobiographical memory (pp. 25-49). Cambridge:  Cambridge University Press.

b. Brewer, W. F. (1992).  The theoretical and empirical status of the 
flashbulb memory hypothesis.  In E. Winograd, & U. Neisser (Eds.), Affect and 
accuracy in recall: Studies of "flashbulb" memories (pp. 274-305).  Cambridge: 
Cambridge University Press.

c. Brewer, W. F. (1994).  Autobiographical memory and survey research.  In N. 
Schwarz & S. Sudman (Eds.), Autobiographical memory and the validity of 
retrospective reports. (pp. 11-20). New York: Springer-Verlag.

d. Brewer, W. F.  (1997).  Children's eyewitness memory research: Implications 
from schema memory and autobiographical memory research.  In N. L. Stein, P. 
A. Ornstein, B. Tversky, & C. Brainerd (Eds.), Memory for everyday and 
emotional events (pp. 453-466).  Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. 

e. Brewer, W. F. (1996).  What is recollective memory?  In D. C. Rubin (Ed.), 
Remembering our past: Studies in autobiographical memory (pp. 19-66).  
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

		2. Experiments

a. Brewer, W. F. (1988).  Qualitative analysis of the recalls of randomly 
sampled autobiographical events. In M. M. Gruneberg, P. E. Morris, & R. N. 
Sykes (Eds.), Practical aspects of memory: Current research and issues  (Vol. 
1, pp. 263-268). Chichester: Wiley.

b. Brewer, W. F. (1988).  Memory for randomly sampled autobiographical events.  
In U. Neisser & E. Winograd (Ed.), Remembering reconsidered: Ecological and 
traditional approaches to the study of memory (pp. 21-90). Cambridge: 
Cambridge University Press.

	C. Amnesia

		1. Theory

a. Brewer, W. F. (in preparation).  Amnesia and the structure of human memory.


IV. KNOWLEDGE ACQUISITION


	A. General

		1. Theory

a. Vosniadou, S., & Brewer, W. F. (1987).  Theories of knowledge restructuring 
in development. Review of Educational Research, 57, 51-67.

b. Brewer, W. F. (1989).  The activation and acquisition of knowledge. In S. 
Vosniadou & A. Ortony (Eds.), Similarity and analogical reasoning  (pp. 532-
545). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

c. Brewer, W. F., & Samarapungavan, A. (1991). Children's theories vs. 
scientific theories: Differences in reasoning or differences in knowledge?. In 
R. R. Hoffman & D. S. Palermo (Eds.), Cognition and the symbolic processes: 
Applied and ecological perspectives  (pp. 209-232).    Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

d. Chinn, C. A., & Brewer, W. F.  (in press).  Theories of knowledge 
acquisition.  In B. J. Fraser, & K. Tobin (Eds.), International Handbook of 
Science Education, Dordrecht, Holland: Kluwer.

e. Chinn, C., & Brewer, W. F. (in preparation).  A framework for knowledge 
acquisition.  


		2. Experiments

a.  Brewer, W. F., & Dupree, D. A. (in preparation).  Schema acquisition: 
Episodic and generic memory for places.

	B. Explanation-Based Learning (EBL)

			1. Theory

a. Ahn, W-K., & Brewer, W. F. (1993).  Psychological studies of explanation-
based learning. In G. DeJong (Ed.). Investigating explanation-based learning 
(pp. 295-316). Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

		2. Experiments

a. Ahn, W-K., Mooney, R. J., Brewer, W. F., & DeJong, G. F. (1987).  Schema 
acquisition from one example: Psychological evidence for explanation-based 
learning. Proceedings of the Ninth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science 
Society, 50-57.

b. Ahn, W.-K., & Brewer, W. F. (1988).  Similarity-based and explanation-based 
learning of explanatory and nonexplanatory information. Proceedings of the 
Tenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society, 524-530.

c. Ahn, W-k., Brewer, W. F., & Mooney, R. J. (1992).  Schema acquisition from 
a single example.  Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and 
Cognition, 18, 391-412.

	C. Observational Astronomy

		1. Experiments

a. Vosniadou, S., & Brewer, W. F. (1992).  Mental models of the earth: A study 
of conceptual change in childhood.  Cognitive Psychology, 24, 535-585. 

b. Vosniadou, S., & Brewer, W. F. (1993).  Constraints on knowledge 
acquisition: Evidence from children's models of the earth and the day/night 
cycle. Proceedings of the Fifteenth Annual Conference 

c. Vosniadou, S., & Brewer, W. F.  (1994).  Mental models of the day/night 
cycle. Cognitive Science, 18, 123-183. 

d. Brewer, W. F.. (in preparation).  Models of observational astronomy in 
adults.

e. Vosniadou, S., & Brewer, W. F. (in preparation).  Children's models of 
observational astronomy.

	D. Naive Models

a. Brewer, W. F., & Chinn, C. A.  (in preparation).  Domain specificity and 
domain generality in children's naive models of the world.


	D. Cross-Cultural

		1. Experiment

a. Vosniadou, S., & Brewer, W. F. (1990).  A cross-cultural investigation of 
children's conceptions about the earth, the sun, and the moon: Greek and 
American data. In H. Mandl, E. DeCorte, N. Bennett, & H. F. Friedrich (Eds.), 
Learning and instruction: European research in an international context (605-
629). Oxford: Pergamon.

b. Samarapungavan, A., Vosniadou, S., & Brewer, W. F. (1996).  Mental models 
of the earth, sun, and moon: Indian children's cosmologies.  Cognitive 
Development, 11, 491-521. 

c. Brewer, W. F.,.& Herdrich, D. J. (in preparation).  A cross-cultural study 
of the acquisition of knowledge in the domain of astronomy.

	E. Role of Anomalous Data

		1. Theory

a. Chinn, C. A., & Brewer, W. F. (1993).  The role of anomalous data in 
knowledge acquisition: A theoretical framework and implications for science 
instruction. Review of Educational Research, 63, 1-49.

b.Brewer, W. F., & Chinn, C. A. (in press).  Scientists' responses to 
anomalous data: Evidence from psychology, history, and philosophy of science.  
PSA 1994, (Vol. 1), East Lansing, MI: Philosophy of Science Association. 

		2. Experiments

a. Brewer, W. F., & Chinn, C. A. (1991).  Entrenched beliefs, inconsistent 
information, and knowledge change.  In L. Birnbaum (Ed.),  Proceedings of the 
1991 International Conference on the Learning Sciences  (67-73).  
Charlottesville, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in 
Education.

b. Chinn, C. A., & Brewer, W. F. (1992).  Psychological responses to anomalous 
data.  Proceedings of the Fourteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive 
Science Society (pp. 165-170). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. 

c. Chinn, C. A., & Brewer, W. F. (1993).  Factors that influence how people 
respond to anomalous data.  Proceedings of the Fifteenth Annual Conference of 
the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 318-323).  Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. 

d.Chinn, C. A. & Brewer, W. F. (submitted).  Mental models of data: A theory 
of how people evaluate data.

e. Chinn, C. A. & Brewer, W. F. (submitted).  An empirical test of a taxonomy 
of responses to anomalous data. 

d. Chinn, C.A., & Brewer, W. F.  (in preparation).  Empirical studies of 
belief  change.


V. PSYCHOLOGY OF SCIENCE


	1. Theory

a. Brewer, W. F., & Lambert, B. L. (1993).  The theory ladenness of 
observation: Evidence from cognitive psychology. Proceedings of the Fifteenth 
Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 254-259). Hillsdale, 
NJ: Erlbaum. 

b. Brewer, W. F., & Chinn, C. A. (1994).  Scientists' responses to anomalous 
data: Evidence from psychology, history, and philosophy of science.  PSA 1994, 
(Vol. 1) (pp. 304-313), East Lansing, MI: Philosophy of Science Association. 

c. Chinn, C. A., & Brewer, W. F. (1996).  Mental models in data 
interpretation.  Philosophy of Science, 63, S221-S219.

d. Brewer, W. F., & Mishra, P. Psychology of science. (submitted).  In. W. 
Bechtel & G. Graham (Eds.).  A companion to cognitive science.  Oxford: 
Blackwell.

e. Brewer, W. F. Samarapungavan, A., & Chinn, C.  (in preparation)  The nature 
and development of explanation,Minds and Machines.

f. Brewer, W. F.  (in preparation)  Rationality in children.  In K. Rosengren, 
C. Johnson, & P. Harris Imagining the impossibvle: The development of magical, 
scientific, and religious thinking in contemporary society.

g. Brewer, W. F. & Lambert, B. (in preparation).  The theory-laden nature of 
observation: Experimental evidence.

	2. Experiment


a. Brewer, W. F., & Chinn, C. A. (in press).  The theory-ladenness of data: An 
experimental demonstration.  Proceedings of the Sixteenth Annual Conference of 
the Cognitive Science Society .  Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. 

b. Vicente, K. J., & Brewer, W. F. (1993).  Reconstructive remembering of the 
scientific literature.  Cognition, 46, 101-128.

c. Brewer, W. F., & Vicente, K.   (in preparation).  Reconstructive recall of 
scientific text.

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